7 Mistakes You May be Making in Your Spin Class

📷: Malise Gardiner Photography

📷: Malise Gardiner Photography

Everyone knows The Roll Team is all about getting the biggest bang for your fitness buck so we put together a little list of things you may be doing that reduce the effectiveness of your ride. If you find yourself doing any of these or ALL of them (we hope not) be sure to clean up your form to make the most of your Roll sweat seshes!

  1. The Death Grip: At times it may seem like it but we promise your bike isn't going to take off and shoot across the room. Relax those hands and let go of the death grip. It's a waste of energy and leads to a bigger problem of supporting your weight on your hands & wrists. If your hands are sore post-ride, that's your sign to lighten up!  For better results, be intentional about balancing your weight over your abs, glutes, & quads! 
  2. Slacking on Resistance: We know we know...."add another turn" or "let's take this to the top" can make you feel like your legs might just spin off but it's actually dangerous to ride with little to no resistance. Bouncing on the bike with 0 resistance can lead to hip & knee problems and the instructors can spot this big cheat a mile away. Any time you feel tired, by all means take a break but always make sure to "add a few turns" on the resistance when you stand or climb to ensure the safest rides and a beast mode sweat sesh. 

  3. Pushing without Pulling: Spin shoes guarantee as much pulling as pushing on each pedal stroke as well as making your ride super smooth and more effective. Toe cages have a bit of a gap between your shoe and the top of the cage creating less efficiency in the strokes. If you focus on eliminating the pause on the bottom of your pedal stroke and really drive your knee up & out to complete the rotation, you'll find greater power and a better burn for your ham strings. Our bikes have an SPD clip and can be found at the Bicycle Superstore or Capitol Cyclery, both on Prien Lake Road. 

  4. Attacking a Climb from the Get-Go: Just as with a sprint, it's super important to pace yourself on a hill. When you're about to take on a hill on a regular bike your body shifts forward and backward a bit. You should approach a climbin indoor-cycling the same way. Begin with your hands on the lower outside of the handlebars (position 2) with a bend at the hips. When it really starts to feel thick + sticky, move your hands to the straight part of the handle bar right in front of you (position 1). This raises your torso and increases you hip angle giving you a noticeable energy boost....now's the time to dig deep. 

  5. Copping out on Your Core: Just because your abs don't touch the pedals doesn't mean they aren't involved in every stroke. Your core plays a major role in indoor cycling which means that intentionally engaging it will make your ride even more effective. To do so, lengthen your spine, roll your shoulders back, and picture your ribs lifting off your hips. Form = everything.

  6. Overdoing the Hand Weights: Because the weight series' usually involves lots of reps, we typically recommend 1-3 lb weights. Of course muscle fatigue is the goal but within reason. You will get a bigger benefit by doing the exercises correctly with lighter weights than doing them incorrectly with heavier ones.  

  7. Skipping Your Stretch: There aren't a lot of facts to prove stretching will prevent injury however, you earned 2-5 minutes of elongating all those muscles we've just been contracting so intensely. Even 2 minutes of stretching is immensely better than none at all. We top off every sweat sesh with a few stretches because sealing your ride with a moment of peace is priceless. 

📷: Malise Gardiner Photographuy

📷: Malise Gardiner Photographuy